Fall 2022 Courses

All 100 and 200-level philosophy courses satisfy the Gen Ed Humanities requirement -- except PHIL 120, which satisfies the Mathematics requirement. We offer both a major and a minor in philosophy plus a concentration in Politics, Philosophy, and Law. More information can be found at philosophy.cofc.edu.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN PHILOSOPHY:

33 semester hours in philosophy which must include 120; 201; 202; and 450 (or PPLW 400). Of the remaining 21 hours, at least 3 hours must be taken in value theory courses; 12 hours must be taken at or above the 200 level; and least nine hours must be taken at or above the 300 level.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY

18 semester hours in philosophy which must include a course in the history of philosophy (201, 202, 304, 305, 306, 307, or 310), and one course at or above the 300 level.

Philosophy majors who are interested in independent study options (including Internships, Bachelor’s Essays, and Teaching Apprenticeships) should consult with the department chair or their advisor. A maximum of six hours these courses may be taken to satisfy the requirement of nine elective hours at or above the 300-level.

 

CRN #

Subject/Sec.

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

DAYS/TIME

CRN 14177

PHIL 101.01

Introduction to Philosophy

Hemmenway

MWF 11:00-11:50

CRN 14255

PHIL 101.02

Introduction to Philosophy

Fasko

TR 10:50-12:05

CRN 14386

PHIL 101.03

Introduction to Philosophy

Boyle

TR 1:40-2:55

CRN 14813

PHIL 101.04

Introduction to Philosophy

Hough

MWF 12:00-12:50

CRN 14388

PHIL 105.01

Contemporary Moral Problems

Coseru

TR 1:40-2:55

CRN 14953

PHIL 105.02

Contemporary Moral Problems

Nadelhoffer

TR 10:50-12:15

CRN 14736

PHIL 115.01

Critical Thinking

Baker

MWF 9:00-9:50

CRN 16133

PHIL 115.02

Critical Thinking

Baker

MWF10:00-10:50

CRN 13715

PHIL 120.01

Symbolic Logic

Grantham

MWF 10:00-10:50

CRN 13716

PHIL 120.02

Symbolic Logic

Grantham

MWF 11:00-11:50

CRN 15363

PHIL 155.01

Environmental Ethics

Kingston

TR 9:25-10:40

CRN 15364

PHIL 155.02

Environmental Ethics

Kingston

TR 12:15-1:30

CRN 13471

PHIL 201.01

History of Ancient Philosophy

Baker

MWF 12:00-12:50

CRN 16123

CRN 16124

PHIL 206.01

PHIL 245.01

Topics in Law and Morality

Environmental Philosophy

Kingston

MW 2:00-3:15

CRN 16122

PHIL 208.01

Knowledge and Reality

Coseru

TR 10:50-12:05

CRN 16125

PHIL 265.01

Philosophy of Science

Grantham

MWF 1:00-1:50

CRN 16126

PHIL 280.01

Aesthetics

Neufeld

TR 12:15-1:30

CRN 14987

PHIL 301.01

Topics in Ethical Theory: Moral Psychology

Nadelhoffer

TR 1:40-2:25

CRN 16127

PHIL 304.01

Nineteenth-Century Philosophy

Hough

MW 3:25-4:40

CRN 14988

PPLW 400.01

Seminar in Politics, Philosophy and Law

Neufeld

TR 9:25-10:40

PHIL 101.01 Introduction to Philosophy

Prof. Hemmenway

CRN 14177 (MWF 11:00-11:50 am)

NO PREREQUISITE

This course will introduce you to philosophy by means of a careful study of selections from some of the great philosophers on the theme of the good life.  Some of the philosophers we’ll read are Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, Spinoza, Nietzsche, and Sartre; thus, all of the major periods of Western philosophy will be represented. Some of the many questions we will raise about the good life are:  What is the good life?  Is it completely individual, or can we argue that some lives are better than others?  Is morality a necessary part of the good life?  Is happiness?

PHIL 101.02: Introduction to Philosophy

Prof. Fasko

CRN 14255 (TR 10:50 am-12:05 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

This course focuses on several fundamental philosophical question from the perspective of the Western tradition that still bear significance today. We will primarily read historical texts but also include more contemporary work as well as some things about how to do, read, and write philosophy. We will address questions such as: What is philosophy? What is truth? What it is its relation to lying? What are the limits of knowledge? What is the relation between mind and body? Is there anything that makes us the same over time? What, if anything, is the difference between the minds of humans and non-human animals? How, if at all, does this affect our (moral) obligations towards non-human animals? What are our moral obligations and duties more generally? What does it mean to act morally? What is the difference between morally and legally right? Are there cases where moral trumps law or vice versa?

 PHIL 101.03: Introduction to Philosophy

Prof. Boyle

CRN 14386 (TR 1:40-2:55 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

In this course, we will examine several traditional, fundamental philosophical questions that still have contemporary significance. We will read classic historical philosophical texts, as well as some more recent works (mainly from the Western tradition). Questions will include some combination of the following: Is knowledge possible? What is truth? What, if anything, accounts for personal identity – that is, what makes a person the same over time? How do concepts of race and gender shape our own sense of identity? What is it to be conscious? Could machines think? How do we think? Are there any objective truths about morality? Do we have obligations to animals or to the environment? If so, what are they?

 PHIL 101.04: Introduction to Philosophy

Prof. Hough

CRN 14813 (MWF 12:00-12:50 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

That is a human being?  Our beliefs about the human constitution necessarily shape our sense of what is good for us (indeed, the realization, actualization or fulfillment of our ‘nature’ is usually the aim of an ethical account).  Do human creatures have immortal souls, or souls of a very different sort?  Are we essentially rational?  Political? Products of our culture, or beings already equipped with knowledge? Do our lives ‘mean’ anything?  Is human life part of a grand cosmic scheme, or is it a meaningless series of actions and accidents?  Is the cosmos moral and just?  Can a life that ends in calamity be redeemed?  What is redemption?

PHIL 105.01: Contemporary Moral Problems

Prof. Coseru

CRN 14388 (TR 1:40-2:55 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

The coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has had a profound impact on our personal and professional lives, and has generated a whole host of new moral dilemmas. For instance, is it right to close entire sectors of the economy (e.g., schools, universities, sporting events, entertainment) to fight a deadly disease? Should public health trump personal, leisure, and business interests? How should we negotiate personal safety and professional obligations (work, study, etc.)? Should medical personnel be permitted to play God and triage emergency room patients on the basis of their age, health profile, and vaccination status? Looking to the future, should we use genetic engineering to design more perfect and resilient children? How should governments respond to pandemics? Are rent relief, eviction moratoriums, stimulus checks, and business loans enough or even the right response? Last, but not least, how has the pandemic impacted our attitudes towards personal relationships, sex, and dating? The goal of this course is twofold: (i) to examine these issues in depth in light of various ethical theories, and (ii) to gain a deep understanding of the practical aspects of morality.

PHIL 101.02: Contemporary Moral Problems

Prof. Nadelhoffer

CRN 14953 (ONLINE, TR 10:50 am-12:05 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

This course provides an introduction to ethics by examining contemporary issues such as euthanasia, the right to die, abortion, the morality of eating meat, wealth inequality, justice, and world hunger. For each issue, we will read arguments from both side of the debate with the goal of helping you develop and better defend your own views.

PHIL 115.01 and 115.02: Critical Thinking

Prof. Baker

CRN 14736 (MWF 9:00-9:50 am)

CRN 16133 (MWF10:00-10:50 am)

NO PREREQUISITE

In this course we learn classic approaches to sound reasoning and judgment. We study basic logic in order to apply it to common argumentation. We pay careful attention to the role of evidence and the need for definitions and clear concepts. We will develop arguments with an eye to promoting truth. Students will apply what they learn about critical thinking to select issues in scientific, moral, and legal reasoning. We will gain crucial practice in writing well-organized argumentative essays. The overall goal is for students to become better critical thinkers, able to make easy use of the many resources that exist for the improvement of our reasoning.

 PHIL 120.01 and 120.02: Symbolic Logic

Prof. Grantham

CRN 13715 (MWF 10:00-10:50 am)

CRN 13716 (MWF 11:00-11:50 am)

NO PREREQUISITE

We find arguments in many areas of human life: politics, legal reasoning, science, and everyday discussions.  In each of these domains, people offer reasons and evidence to support their beliefs.  Well-educated college graduates should be able to critically assess these arguments.  This course aims to strengthen your native ability to assess arguments.  Specifically, this course introduces the methods of formal deductive logic.  We will learn how to translate English sentences into propositional and predicate logic and to assess the validity of inferences in these languages.  Studying this formal system will build abstract reasoning skills, teach you how to recognize and construct valid arguments, and improve your ability to detect mistakes in reasoning. 

 PHIL 155.01 and 155.02: Environmental Ethics

Prof. Kingston

CRN 15363 (TR 9:25-10:40 am)

CRN 15364 (TR 12:15-1:30 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

In this course we look at the question of what we should do regarding environmental issues and why. We will explore this question from both a highly theoretical perspective and a practical perspective. In the theoretical mode we will ask what value nature has. Is it just valuable for what it can do for humans, for other sentient beings, or is it valuable itself?  In the practical mode we will ask about practical policy proposals to curb climate change and how they balance different values or visions of the future. 

PHIL 201: History of Ancient Philosophy

Prof. Baker

CRN 10485 (MWF 12:00-12:50 pm)

PREREQUISITE:  One course in philosophy or departmental permission

In this course we will read ancient texts in translation, learning and engaging with the thought of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, and the Epicureans on issues of ethics, moral psychology, epistemology, physics, metaphysics, and justice.

PHIL 206: Topics in Law and Morality

PHIL 245.01: Environmental Philosophy

Prof. Kingston

CRN 16123 (MW 2:00-3:15 pm)

CRN 16124 (MW 2:00-3:15 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

Environmental law raises some fascinating philosophical questions. For instance, what is the appropriate role of scientists in environmental legal proceedings? Is pollution by one state an act of aggression that should be prohibited by international law? What does it mean for a river, a species, or a mountain to have legal rights? Who is guilty regarding climate change, and for what? How should the interests of future generations be protected by law (if at all)?  In this course you will explore questions like these, and practice forming arguments for positions on them.

PHIL 208: Knowledge and Reality

Prof. Coseru

CRN 16122 (TR 10:50 am -12:05 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

This course is an introductory survey of some of the most complex and engaging questions in epistemology (the theory of knowledge): topics will include the difference between knowledge and mere opinion, whether the way we know ourselves is similar or different than the way we gain knowledge of the external world and the minds of others, as well as questions about the nature of scientific knowledge, the relation between knowledge and power, and the challenge of skepticism. These questions have troubled philosophers and non-philosophers alike for millennia. In this course we will examine some of the most influential classical and contemporary attempts to answer these questions.

PHIL 265.01: Philosophy of Science

Prof. Grantham

CRN 16125 (MWF 1:00-1:50 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

What exactly is science?  Is there anything that makes scientific knowledge (as opposed to other kinds of knowledge or belief) distinctive or important?  This course provides a general introduction to the philosophy of science.  We will review several philosophical accounts of the nature of science and scientific method.  We will also examine some particular areas of science (probably including neuroscience, evolutionary psychology, quantum mechanics) as a way to both reflect critically on these philosophical accounts of science and to examine possible philosophical implications of science.

PHIL 280.01: Aesthetics

Prof. Neufeld

CRN 16126 (TR 12:15-1:30 pm)

NO PREREQUISITE

The course is a selective survey of the history and problems of aesthetics and philosophy of art. This will involve a multifaceted exploration of the relationship between art and knowledge, art and morality, art and politics along with the question, “What IS art, anyway?”

PHIL 301.01: Topics in Ethical Theory:  Moral Psychology

Prof. Nadelhoffer

CRN 14987 (ONLINE, TR 1:40-2:55 pm)

PREREQUISITE:  Two courses in philosophy or departmental permission

In this course, we are going to explore the relationship between ethical theory and empirical moral psychology. The central question we will address is whether evidence about how moral decision-making actually works gives us any insight into how moral decision-making should work. We will start by examining the three main ethical theories (using both classical and contemporary texts)—namely, virtue theory, utilitarianism, and deontology. Then, we will turn our attention from ethical theory to moral psychology where we will explore a variety of issues—e.g., the nature and limitations of moral intuitions, how people make judgments about free will and moral responsibility, the relevance of findings from situationist psychology to virtue theory, whether or not humans are capable of altruism, and the relevance of moral disagreement to moral objectivity. Having surveyed some of the empirical literature on moral decision-making, we will end by reading Joshua Greene’s Moral Tribes (2014), where he defends a qualified form of utilitarianism.

PHIL 304.01: Nineteenth-Century Philosophy

Prof. Hough

CRN 16127 (MW 3:25-4:40 pm)

PREREQUISITE:  Two courses in philosophy or departmental permission

The metaphysical ambitions of the nineteenth century continue to inform many modern (and indeed postmodern) philosophical concerns.  We will begin by discussing a central source of nineteenth-century thought, the work of Immanuel Kant.  In Hegel’s idealism we see philosophy and history converge; Schopenhauer, Marx, and Kierkegaard provide critiques of this Hegelian convergence.  Finally, Nietzsche raises fundamental questions about the very notions around which this century revolves, e.g. the self (consciousness, the will, the scope of reason) and the world (scientific and ethical realism). In addition to these central texts we will also read excerpts from other nineteenth-century thinkers such as Fichte, Feuerbach, and Schelling.

PPLW 400.01: Seminar in Politics, Philosophy and Law

Prof. Neufeld

CRN 16127 (TR 9:25-10:40 am)

PREREQUISITE:  Permission required; limited to seniors in the PPLW concentration

What are the limits of legitimate political discourse in contemporary democracies? The past several years have raised questions about the state of political discourse in contemporary democracies. Much ink has been spilled about about the value and effects of protest movements, importance of civil discourse and whether it’s in decline—about the norms and limits of democratic deliberation. This course will investigate the philosophical foundations of these questions by reading a variety of democratic theorists on the role of protest, civil disobedience, civility, anger, and more, in democratic deliberation. We will read selections from Teresa Bejan, Cheshire Calhoun, Myisha Cherry, Nancy Fraser, Chantal Mouffe, Martha Nussbaum, Olufemi Taiwo, Iris Marion Young and others.